The Silver Age of DC Comics: 1956-1970

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Front Cover

As promised, here is a short review of Paul Levitz’s latest text on DC comics, The Silver Age of DC Comics: 1956-1970.  This book is of particular interest to me because of my research in the origins of Batwoman.  As I’ve mentioned before, Batwoman made her debut in 1956 in Detectives Comics #233 and continued off and on until 1979 when she was brutally murdered.  I had high hopes that this text might expand a bit on Batwoman and perhaps have further insight into her creation and the role she played in the new Bat Family.  I’m afraid I was extremely disappointed in that area, but here is what I found after looking through this text and once again comparing it to the behemoth 75 Years of DC Comics: The Art of Modern Myth Making.

First, as in the text I reviewed earlier on Levitz’s The Golden Age of DC Comics, one thing that is completely new to this text is an interview conducted by Levitz’s.  This time, he interviews comics’ great Neal Adams.  I read this interview and enjoyed it, but I certainly would not have bought the book for that alone.  I then went through and compared the actual written text, essay if you will, dealing with the silver age of comics to that which is found in the 75 Years text.  As with The Golden Age text, I found little difference.  It is pretty much word for word what you’ll find in 75 Years.  

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Back Cover

I then randomly went through the rest of this text, which has only images and captions, and compared that to the larger 75 Year text.  Usually, just when I thought I had found a unique picture, I would flip a few pages one direction or the other and find the same picture in the other text, sometimes enlarged or sometimes reduced.  With that said, I do believe there are MANY additional silver age pictures in this text.  In 75 Years Levitz’s uses 192 pages to discuss and illustrate the silver age of comics.  But this newer text, The Silver Age of DC Comics, is a whopping 391 pages.  That’s nearly 200 pages more (if you take out the first 13 pages for the interview).  Those pages have to contain images that 75 Years does not.

Bottom line, if you love comics as much as I do, you’ll definitely enjoy Paul Levitz’s The Silver Age of DC Comics, even if you already own the 18 pound brick of 75 Years.  It’s well worth the money and a little easier to handle weight and size wise.

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